Cinemas in Wolverhampton

Wolverhampton is recorded as being the site of a decisive battle between the unified Mercian Angles and West Saxons against the raiding Danes in 910, although sources are unclear as to whether the battle itself took place in Wednesfield.

Wolverhampton is recorded in the Domesday Book in 1086 as being in the Hundreds of Seisdon and the county of Staffordshire. The lords of the manor are listed as the canons of St Mary (the church’s dedication was changed to St Peter after this date), with the tenant-in-chief being Samson, William the Conqueror’s personal chaplain. Wolverhampton at this date is a large settlement of fifty households.

In 1179, there is mention of a market held in the town, and in 1204 it had come to the attention of King John that the town did not possess a Royal Charter for holding a market. This charter for a weekly market held on a Wednesday was eventually granted on 4 February 1258

The young Princess Alexandrina Victoria of Kent (later Queen Victoria) is known to have visited Wolverhampton in the 1830s and described it as “a large and dirty town” but one which received her “with great friendliness and pleasure”. In Victorian times, Wolverhampton grew to be a wealthy town mainly due to the huge amount of industry that occurred as a result of the abundance of coal and iron deposits in the area. The remains of this wealth can be seen in local houses such as Wight wick Manor and The Mount (both built for the Mander family, prominent varnish and paint manufacturers), and Tettenhall Towers. All three are located in the western fringe of Wolverhampton, in the areas known as Wightwick and Tettenhall. Many other houses of similar stature were demolished in wolverhampton gained its first parliamentary representation as part of the Reform.

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